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Neuroscience Concentration

Neuroscience is expanding so rapidly both at the University and national levels, opportunities for students in the neuroscience field are growing as well: research opportunities are becoming more varied, graduate programs are becoming more competitive and career options are more numerous in response to this growth.

Neuroscience students can choose to major in either biology or psychology. Regardless of whether they approach the study of the brain from the perspective of the natural sciences or social sciences, students are guaranteed a research-intensive experience that puts them in close proximity to passionate faculty members who are dedicated to preparing their students for challenging careers in a constantly changing field. Students benefit from diverse courses based in both biology and psychology, highly equipped laboratories and the potential to do independent research as early as their first year on campus.

With a background in neuroscience, students are prepared for a multitude of careers, in the sciences and beyond. Each year, neuroscience students successfully gain admission to medical, dental and veterinary school and pursue careers in fields like pharmaceuticals, scientific journalism, research and the law.

Neuroscience

Interdisciplinary Concentration in Neuroscience for Biology, Psychology, and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Majors

Majors in biology, psychology, or biochemistry and molecular biology with a special interest in neurobiology or behavioral neuroscience may apply to pursue an interdisciplinary concentration in neuroscience. Because of the scheduling demands of the concentration, students are strongly encouraged to declare as early as possible (fall of sophomore year is suggested).

To qualify for a Bachelor of Science degree, students must complete the degree requirements stated under Graduation, including general education requirements, wellness, curriculum, achievement, and residency requirements, along with completion of the requirements for at least one major. The B.S. degree at the University of Richmond requires a concentration in science and quantitative reasoning. The B.S. degree will require depth of coursework and/or research as determined by the department or program along with Math 211 (or equivalent) and a second course that focuses on advanced quantitative methods appropriate to scientific inquiry.

Students are expected to fulfill all prerequisites necessary for courses within the major. Prerequisites do not count toward the major unless otherwise noted.

Designated Courses for Biology Majors

17.5 units, including:

BIOL 199 Introduction to Biological Thinking or BIOL 190 Integrated Science/Math/Computer Science 1 with Lab 1 or BIOL 192 Science, Math and Research Training I

BIOL 200 Integrated Biological Principles I

BIOL 202 Integrated Biological Principles II

Five additional units of biology approved for the major, four of which are at the 300 level, three of which are chosen from the list below, and three of which must have a lab. Students with one unit of research may take two of the five with a lab. The one unit of research may be satisfied by BIOL 350 (taken twice for 0.5 unit each), BIOL 395 (1 unit) or completion of BIOL 406 (summer undergraduate research) or by the dept chair's approval of an external summer research program.

BIOL 308 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy with Lab

BIOL 310 The Biology of Poisoning

BIOL 312 Developmental Biology with Lab

BIOL 317 Mechanochemical Cell Biology with Lab

BIOL 338 Comparative Animal Physiology with Lab

BIOL 342 Neurodevelopment

BIOL 343 Neurobiology with Lab

BIOL 344 Behavioral Ecology with Lab

BIOL 351 Special Topics (requires Neuroscience program approval)

BIOL 354 Biological Basis of Neurodegenerative Diseases with Lab

BIOL 390 Advances in Biology (Biological Toxins; Ion Channels)

CHEM 141 Chemistry: Structure, Thermodynamics, and Kinetics or CHEM 191 Integrated Science/Math/Computer Science 3 with Laboratory or CHEM 192 Science, Math and Research Training II with Lab

CHEM 205 Organic Chemistry I

CHEM 206 Organic Chemistry II

Quantitative-physical science, MATH 211 Calculus I or MATH 190 Integrated Science/Math/Computer Science and two additional units chosen from:

One unit from the following:

MATH 209 Introduction to Statistical Modeling

MATH 212 Calculus II or MATH 232 Scientific Calculus II

MATH 289 Applied Regression Analysis

One unit from the following:

CMSC 150 Introduction to Computing

PHYS 127 General Physics 1 or PHYS 131 General Physics with Calculus I or PHYS 191 Integrated Science/Math/Computer Science 2 with Lab.

PSYC 200 Methods and Analyses OR BIOL 320 Experimental Design and Biostatistics (BIOL 320 may count only for quantitative physical science requirement or 300 level additional unit in biology, but not both; MATH 209 cannot be taken in combination with PSYC 200 or BIOL 320)

GEOG 260 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Completion of the two semester IQS course meets the quantitative-physical science requirement for the BS degree

PSYC 200 Methods and Analyses*

Two units of neuroscience-related psychology, chosen from:

PSYC 331 Behavioral Neuroscience

PSYC 333 Cognitive Science

PSYC 341 Cognitive Neuroscience

PSYC 353 Clinical Neuroscience

PSYC 444 Clinical Case Studies

Approved 400-level seminar (requires Neuroscience program approval)

.5 unit of neuroscience-related research in biology or chemistry or an approved experience** that culminates in a written report or poster presentation

*Students who are pursuing the neuroscience concentration may request to bypass the PSYC 100 pre-requisite for the PSYC 200 course. Please make requests to the Chair of the Psychology Department.

**Approvals for these classes must be requested in writing to the NRSC Advisory Committee.

Designated Courses for Psychology Majors

17 units, including:

PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychological Science

PSYC 200 Methods and Analyses

PSYC 300 Methods and Analyses Core Project

PSYC 331 Behavioral Neuroscience

PSYC 341 Cognitive Neuroscience

One unit in neuroscience research, selected from:

PSYC 361 Independent Research

PSYC 461/PSYC 462 Senior Research

PSYC 491/PSYC 492 Senior Honors

or a second PSYC 300

One unit approved neuroscience-related senior seminar

PSYC 359 Advanced Neuroscience Data Analysis and Visualization

One additional PSYC elective chosen from:

PSYC 319 Psychopathology

PSYC 321 Principles of Behavior

PSYC 333 Cognitive Science

PSYC 353 Clinical Neuroscience

PSYC 444 Clinical Case Studies

PSYC 449 Advanced Seminar: ADHD

PSYC 449 Advanced Seminar: Neuroplasticity

PSYC 449 Advanced Seminar: Trauma and Recovery

MATH 212 Calculus II

BIOL 200 Integrated Biological Principles I*

BIOL 202 Integrated Biological Principles II

CHEM 141 Chemistry: Structure, Thermodynamics, and Kinetics

CHEM 205 Organic Chemistry I

CHEM 206 Organic Chemistry II

One unit of biology, chosen from:

BIOL 308 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

BIOL 312 Developmental Biology

BIOL 317 Mechanochemical Cell Biology with Lab

BIOL 338 Comparative Animal Physiology

BIOL 343 Neurobiology

BIOL 344 Behavioral Ecology

BIOL 354 Biological Basis of Neurodegenerative Diseases with Lab

*Students who are pursuing the neuroscience concentration in the Psychology major may request to use PSYC 200 in lieu of BIOL 199 as a pre-requisite for BIOL 200. Requests must be made to the Chair of the Biology Department.

Designated Courses for Biochemistry Majors

Note: A grade of C- (1.7) or better is required in each chemistry and biology course applied toward the major.

For the Bachelor of Science degree:

17-17.25 units, including:

BIOL 199 Introduction to Biological Thinking or BIOL 190 Integrated Science/Math/Computer Science 1 with Lab 1 or BIOL 192 Science, Math and Research Training I

BIOL 200 Integrated Biological Principles I

BIOL 202 Integrated Biological Principles II

BMB 300 Junior Seminar

CHEM 141 Chemistry: Structure, Thermodynamics, and Kinetics

CHEM 205-CHEM 206 Organic Chemistry

CHEM 309 Physical Chemistry

CHEM 324 Experimental Biochemistry

CHEM 325 Experimental Biophysical Chemistry

CHEM 326 Biochemistry

Two units of neuroscience-related biology courses, chosen from:

BIOL 312 Developmental Biology with Lab

BIOL 317 Mechanochemical Cell Biology

BIOL 343 Neurobiology

BIOL 354 Biological Basis of Neurodegenerative Diseases with Lab

Two senior seminars, to include the presentation of a research topic, chosen from

BMB 310 Senior Seminar I

BMB 311 Senior Seminar II

MATH 212 or MATH 232 Calculus II

PHYS 127 Algebra-Based General Physics 1 with Lab or PHYS 131 Calculus-Based General Physics 1 with Lab or PHYS 191 Integrated Science/Math/Computer Science 4 with Lab

PHYS 132 Calculus-Based General Physics 2 with Lab

PSYC 200 Methods and Analyses*

One unit of neuroscience-related psychology, chosen from

PSYC 331 Behavioral Neuroscience

PSYC 333 Cognitive Science

PSYC 341 Cognitive Neuroscience

PSYC 353 Clinical Neuroscience

PSYC 440 Advanced Neuroscience

Approved 400-level seminar**

One unit of neuroscience-related research in biology or chemistry or an approved experience** that culminates in a written report or poster presentation

*Students who are pursuing the neuroscience concentration may request to bypass the PSYC 100 pre-requisite for the PSYC 200 course. Please make requests to the Chair of the Psychology Department.

**Approvals for these classes must be requested in writing to the BMB Committee.